The results are in, the clinical trials have spoken. Drinking relieves –drinking , that is. There’s something in green tea that helps us unwind. And it may begin turning up in other foods shortly. The legendary advantages of green tea– loss, , immune system boosting, and much more –have put green tea on everybody’s top ten superfoods list.

Now the teacup’s comfort effect has been shown in the lab. An amino acid called theanine (or L-theanine) accounts for green tea’s magic. First found in 1949, theanine is located almost exclusively in tea leaves. Additionally, it is found in 1 type of mushroom–who wants to unwind with a plate of mushrooms? Clinical trials examining the relaxation effect of theanine generated remarkable results. Japanese researchers found that human volunteers became more relaxed about 30-40 minutes after taking up to 200mg of theanine.

That’s six cups of tea to me and you. Once the theanine is flowing, a few things happen. Your waves begin to shift in the alpha range. That’s a fantastic thing. Alpha brain waves occur when you’re relaxed and calm, but still alert –such as after a or a hot tub, or through meditation. At exactly the exact same time, theanine increases the GABA levels in mind. GABA is a neurotransmitter that’s connected to serotonin and dopamine levels.

This complicated-sounding chemical cocktail leads to a relaxation effect. And what is more, theanine also lowers your . Well, OK, the blood pressure part is only proven in rats. So if you are stressed and anxious, unwind with a few cups of green tea. You should start to feel relaxed and awake in about 30 minutes.

Conclusion

Theanine will not make you drowsy, but when it happens to be bedtime, studies also have shown you will sleep better and awake more refreshed. Incidentally, if you are already relaxed when you begin, it doesn’t matter how much theanine you get–you won’t get any more relaxed. If you prefer to get your theanine in a pill, you are in luck. Supplements containing theanine are easily available. Among the Japanese companies heavily involved in theanine study went beyond simple green tea extracts and developed Suntheanine, which is a synthesized, ultra-pure theanine. I’m unsure what they have in mind, but the possibilities are wide open. Over 50 food items comprising Suntheanine, such as ice cream, candy, and drinks, are now sold in Korea, Japan, and Europe. In America, it is only available in supplements at the moment. But I’m excited about seeing it in something that goes with my cup of tea.